Wednesday, 30 October 2013

Chrysanthemums

 There is so little to be done in the garden at this time of year, apart from turning over the compost pile that is. Thankfully now the weather has changed and we are on our way to winter, there is time to curl up with seed catalogues to plan for next year.

I read a post from jo-throughthekeyhole about receiving Chrysanthemums & it reminded me about my dad in his younger years.

My granddad was a gardener & he also worked in horticulture. Whilst my dad didn't follow into his trade he followed the hobby & built a huge greenhouse in the garden of the house he & my mum bought when they married over 60 years ago.

Anyway as the story goes when my granddad retired he still had contacts in the trade. He & my dad ordered each year 1000 Chrysanthemum stools. My dad grew on 700 in his greenhouse & my granddad grew on the remaining 300.

Each year these Chrysanthemums were ready for Christmas & between them they made enough money to run the homemade boilers they had made for their greenhouses & to pay for other supplies they needed for the garden.

There is a chapter on growing chrysanthemums in this style in an old gardening book I had given to me last year -
 I think I shall give it a go next year, after all the greenhouse is empty at this time of year anyway. Though I shan't be growing on quite the same scale. Perhaps removing a couple of  0 would be more like it.

As well as the spray Chrysanthemums I rather fancy some of the fat fluffy ones too. I shall post my selection when I have made a final decision.

Enjoy your day

13 comments:

  1. We've grown chrysanthemums in the past but to get the lovely blooms the plants needs lots of attention e.g. disbudding. They also need room to grow on when not in bloom. We could grow them at the plot as we did but then they flower at a time when we may not visit the plot very often. The home greenhouse is just too full of other things. It's a pirt as I do like them for the house.

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    1. Yes, listening to my dad & reading about it - it does seem a lot of faffing about. Not that he described it like that, I think it would be something fun to do in the wintery months.

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  2. That will be an interesting project to take on. There's some really lovely varieties so I shall look forward to hearing which you choose. Your book looks well read, these older books often have loads of great information that you don't get in newer books. Thanks for the mention and link.

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    1. I hope so, there are a huge list of varieties, I'm a bit spoiled for choice.

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  3. I've always liked them but never grown them, perhaps next year... Flighty xx

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    1. Yes, I do have a couple in the garden which I bought as little plants from a garden centre. They are lovely flowers.

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  4. How exciting, I shall be looking forward to your chrysanthemum adventure. I have often thought about doing something similar as gifts for the holidays.

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    1. I hope it works & yes they would make lovely gifts.

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  5. It would be lovely to carry on the family tradition, even if it is in a slightly smaller way :-)

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    1. Yes it would & perhaps it would give my dad an interest again. It would certainly be on a much smaller scale.

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  6. I don't know what a chrysanthemum stool is but I love the idea of having a greenhouse. It seems as if everyone in England has them. I agree that old books can be much more detailed than newer books that assume everyone is too busy to bother really learning about gardening.

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  7. I love that you've been inspired by your dad and grandfather to grow chrysanthemums. They are one of my favourite flowers and, as I introduce more flowers into the veg patch garden, I think I might have to pop one or two chrysanths in as well!

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