Friday, 23 May 2014

Cooking memories

As a child I was a voracious reader, I still would like to be but I really don't have the time. I read anything I could lay my hands on & apart from Enid Blyton, cookery books were my next favourite thing.

My mother was an awful cook, the meals she cooked were edible(ish) though I do recall meal times being fraught affairs & for many years left me with a fear of food. To this day I cannot eat mince of any kind & quite frankly struggle with mashed potato. Being force fed as a child is no fun & I always vowed it was an experience never to be repeated on my own children. I am pleased to say this fear left me once I had my own children as a) I have no wish to blow my own trumpet but I am a pretty good cook & b) once you have your own children you have no time to pander to such whims!

I wasn't taught to cook by my mother though I used to bake at the weekend with my father, I taught myself from books & one particular cookbook from childhood kept on popping into my mind. After a quick search I found a copy on line for a few pence.
I loved reading this book as a child & pretty much learnt to cook from it & it certainly brought back some memories!

I remember making this soup although the first time I made it, it tasted more of flour than harvest vegetable soup, over time I realised I had to cook the flour & butter together over a low heat for a few minutes to remove the flour taste. But, that's how you learn & I have always been a firm believer of learning from your mistakes.

I also remember making these scones with my dad many times-
But there was one recipe which I always wanted to make but was never allowed -
Now the bonus of being a grown up means you can do pretty much what you want, I have my own garden & in particular my own raspberry patch (x2) of red & yellow raspberries, I am indeed going to make the above raspberry cream thingamajig once the crop is ready.

As always enjoy your day xx

53 comments:

  1. The Technicolour food styling in those first full colour cookbooks makes your eyes pop out. Hope your raspberry cream is delicious - I was inspecting the raspberries the other day. The fruit is forming but not so much as a blush yet.

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    1. It certainly does, I spotted a few flowers on mine the other day I didn't see any fruit though.

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  2. Raspberry cream thingamajig sounds amazing! Enjoy! xxx

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    1. It does doesn't it! When I make it I shall post the recipe & the proper name but I think Raspberry cream thingamajig sounds better.

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  3. Oh... please I can't wait to see your raspberries change into a raspberry cream thingamajig! Sounds so yummy!

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    1. A few weeks yet Endah, hopefully I shall get a huge crop so I can make lots.

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  4. So Cottage Pie is out? When I was a child I had to choose a book as a speech day prize. I chose Mrs. Beeton as it was a really large book that looked impressive amongst the other waiting on the stage. I used it a lot and my favourite recipe was a pineapple cream.

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    1. Funnily enough I can ear mash on top of a cottage/fish pie! Cookbooks tend to become prized possessions don't they. Did you keep it or was it lost over time?

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    2. I've still got it - very old-fashioned looking and worse for wear!

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    3. They are normally the best ones, my cookbooks certainly look like they have been used lots!

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  5. Isn't it funny how things from your childhood can really put you off foods. D won't touch anything to from a slow cooker so I have one just for me that I make things in during the colder months for when I get home late from work. You also never mention the words casserole or stew as his mother was and still is a terrible cook and most things that went in the stew or casserole were unrecognisable when they came out. So in our house we have names for the stews and casseroles such as beef in ale or beef in red wine, goulash and chicken chasseur and so on and then he'll eat them. I think I may of had this book many moons ago not sure where it is now although some books have left home with each of the older three kids to help them in their culinary efforts. Will have to ask them.

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    1. It is, I remember being happiest when she served salad for Sunday lunch. She did make a good stew funnily enough, your D would have enjoyed it! Rob took a few of my cookbooks to uni with him, I love it when they do that.

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  6. I love that you tracked this book down, I hope that you love using it and that the recipes taste as good as you remember. xx

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    1. I was looking for it for a while before I found it. It was just as lovely as I remembered it to be. The best bit is as an adult I'm not restricted on what I can make

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  7. Mmm, the raspberry thingamajig will be delicious, how lovely that you found the book. Over the years I've lost a handful of recipes for things that I've really enjoyed, I need to see if I can track them down. I hope you have a good weekend Joanne. CJ xx

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    1. That name is going to stick now, as soon as they have ripened I will be making it. I hope you manage to track them down, it's lovely to see them again.

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  8. Well done on finding the book. Hopefully your childrens memories of mealtimes with be happy ones :-)

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    1. Thank you, it brought back many happy memories of baking as a child. Oh yes, my children had & still have happy mealtimes.

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  9. Its funny how those early cookbooks have a special place in your memory. Mine is the Hamyln all colour cookbook, the very first cookbook i had when i first set up home at 21.
    I hope you really enjoy making that special raspberry dish with your own homegrown raspberries!
    Have a great weekend Joanne!
    Gill xx

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    1. It is isn't it, I still have quite a few of my childhood books so it was great to find a copy of this. I can't wait for them to ripen now, I am so looking forward to it.

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  10. I was quite a fussy eater as a child, there were many things I wouldn't touch, but I've grown out of it I'm glad to say. I love looking through cookery books but my lot prefer plain food so I don't get to experiment much in the kitchen. I'm looking forward to hearing how the raspberry cream thingamajig turns out, I may just be asking for the recipe now I've got a raspberry patch of my own.

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    1. I was awful I must admit, it was more a texture thing & I don't particularly like plain food where as that's all my mum ever cooked. I will be posting the recipe Jo but keeping the name as Raspberry Cream Thingamajig.

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  11. My mum was a terrible cook too. Pastry was always on the raw side. She would cook things like stuffed hearts, yuk. I started to cook when I moved in with an older boyfriend. I had no idea, but he taught me how to make a few dishes and i haven't looked back since. For the first time we have some raspberries growing so if the birds don't get them i'm thinking raspberry sorbet.

    jean xx

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    1. My mums pastry was fine but she bought in in a block & I only remember pastry being used for jam tarts, I could possibly be blanking out some traumatic childhood kitchen images! Oh I hope you get a good crop, sorbet sounds wonderful!

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  12. My Mum was a terrible cook too (her pastry was particularly bad - almost like MDF), but this was because we used to live in the Far East, where it was normal in those days to have domestic servants to do all the cooking for you. It was only when my Dad retired and we returned to England that Mum had to start cooking in earnest. I was educated at boarding school where we had atrocious food, so it wasn't until much later in life that I discovered the joys of food and cooking. I'm making up for lost time though!

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    1. I have read about some of your food experience at boarding school, isn't that where your dislike of fish comes from? It's great to have that interest as an adult & be able to experiment with your likes & dislikes.

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  13. My mum has this book! My mum (and Dad) is a good cook and she had to put up with too picky kids!

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    1. Has she still got it?, my brother & sister were fine it was me who wouldn't eat.

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  14. I had a copy of this book, too, from way back in the early 80s! It fell apart eventually, but I remember the glacé cherry scones being a great favourite of my two children, now both adults. I think there was also a recipe in there called 'Italian liver' which I loved back then. Wouldn't eat it now as I have been vegetarian for many years, but it was jolly good! Ah, happy memories!!

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    1. Did it fall apart from overuse! My dad & I used to make the scones every weekend but sometimes adapted the ingredients used, they were still good. I'm going to make them with the glacé cherries again soon. Happy memories indeed I think I might post some recipes.

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  15. Joanne, my mother was a fabulous cook and I loved cooking with her practically from birth. My sister (9 years older than I) didn't get the cooking gene, never really enjoyed cooking and went in for a lot of packaged convenience foods. My husband was dazzled by my cooking when we first got acquainted because *his* mother had been a terrible cook. It was kind of nice having such a low standard to exceed! :D

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    1. I'm glad your mother was a good cook, I believe there were many out there! Funny you say that my sister was never interested in cooking, both my brother & I do. Lovely story about your husband.

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  16. My Dad was a chef but Mum did all the cooking,except on Fridays when Dad cooked.Mum's vegetables were always overdone.
    Jane x

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    1. It used to be a running joke that when preparing Sunday lunch my mum put the veg on at 8am in the morning when lunch was served at 1pm. Her veg was just dire, mine is barley cooked but that is how we all like it here.

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  17. I've always been a voracious reader, thanks to mum who was a pretty good cook but never particularly enjoyed cooking. Dad wasn't too bad either with the basics. I keep my cooking basic and simple which does me as I'm not a foodie.
    This post certainly bought back some fond, if faded, memories. Flighty xx

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    1. I've always loved reading & have tried to pass that on to my children. It worked apart from Harry who reads when he has to. I can't be described as a foodie but I do like a wide range of foods. I'm glad you had some happy memories. xx

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  18. I had a very similar background with regard to cooking and food. We ate a lot of ground beef (what you would call mince) and it kinds of turns my stomach today as an adult. I'll make burgers occasionally, but no meatloaf in this house. :)

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    1. Oh yes that's the stuff, it still turns my stomach now. I make lasagne using quorn mince which I find quite acceptable & a chilli is normally made by mixed beans & veg. I don't quite trust the stuff even if I mince it myself. Funny how things stick in your mind.

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  19. I have some old cookbooks that were my mum's and reading them, as you say, brings back lots of memories.

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    1. It's lovely to be able to read something which you remember from your past.

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  20. Awesome post thank you for sharing and have a blessed weekend

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    1. Thank you Linda have a great weekend too. xx

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  21. I think I have the same book, I put weight on just reading them though lol

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    1. I hope you do, we shall have to start a cook along!

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  22. How nice that you were able to find a copy of the cookbook you loved so much when you were a child. All five of my kids know how to cook, and enjoy making good food. I count it as one of my successes as a parent. :-)

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    1. Yes it was lovely to find a copy. I have taught my children to cook properly & to experiment. My eldest son enjoys it immensely but the youngest has no interest at all. I am still working on it as I do believe it is a very important skill to pass on.

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  23. I still have our family cook book, it was given to my mum by her mum when she got married, it never did her any good as was was a terrible cook, I remember once we got a liquidiser for the first time and put a whole chicken in it bones and all and made it into soup and we were made to eat it, it was like sawdust.

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    1. Oh that's lovely Dawn, did she not read it? Ew that soup sounds awful.My mum was never that bad, not far off though! I do recall my dad buying my mum a food mixed & she didn't know what to do with it & the microwave.

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  24. Hi Joanne, thanks so much for stopping by and leaving the nice comment on my tea mug exchange. Happy gardening and baking and cooking to you!
    Julie at Julie's Lifestyle

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    1. My pleasure, thank you for stopping by here. Hope you have a great weekend.

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  25. How wonderful that you remember cooking and baking from this book as a child! And how neat to have a chance to finally make that dessert! I too sort of just practiced from books as a kid...And now I love baking and cooking too! Have a great weekend friend! Nicole xo

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    1. There were so many recipes I remembered making & so so many I wasn't allowed to make. Now I can attempt them! I think its a wonderful way to learn how to cook & yes I do think it enables cooking to become a more joyful occasion when you grow up. Have a wonderful weekend.

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  26. Raspberry cream thingamajig sounds amazing and I hope it taste as good as it sounds!

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