Saturday, 10 May 2014

New plants (mostly)

It is so grotty here today, the sky is grey & the threat of rain isn't far off! However I refuse to get down beat about it, I looked out of my office window the other day to see two small toddlers jumping up & down in the puddles with glee. Also it is saving me from watering the pots.

Anyway I am struggling on with my attempt at fair isle knitting & while I understand the concept, putting that into practise is another matter. The front looks ok but I'm getting in an awful mess with the back. It is my first attempt I will persevere on. Last night you would have seen me curled up on the sofa with a crochet blanket on my knee, it was a little chilly! A cup of tea to hand & surrounded with several knitting books & the laptop viewing a you tube channel on fair isle knitting! It did come to me last night as I was getting wrapped up in yarn that many years ago pre children, garden & crafts I would have been taking a decadent bath with a glass of wine or two. Then going out for a lovely meal then a few glasses of wine at the pub. I didn't drink Gin & Tonic back then, I do like growing up.

Stop wittering Joanne & back to the plants, forgive me for the lack of new photos I was up early this morning as the sky was briefly blue & eagerly set about emptying the greenhouse (partially, there are a lot of plants in there). As soon as I opened the French doors the sky turned grey, it didn't stop me however in a mass planting battle, however the camera battery needs charging so you are stuck with this photo again.
At the very front you will see my Samphire plant, to the left Sea Kale both ordered from Victoriana nursery & were delivered on Thursday. The frothy thing on the right is a Feverfew plant which a colleague bought thinking it was parsley. He told me he was going to chuck it out & I said I would have it, I did offer to buy him a parsley plant as he is my second in command but he refused & said he would bring the plant in for me. He has named it Gordon Weed!

I have taken the liberty of adding links for each of my new plants which you can then read at your leisure, I feel I am a bad gardener at times, I don't want to know the Latin name for everything I grow, just the basic does & don't are fine for me.

 I like trying new things & the shocking price which I have seen Samphire sold for made me eager to try it. I did have a little nibble, in the style of a cow grazing grass, I do like to think I grazed a little more delicately than that, although Mikes expression made me think I had ripped a big chunk off. I assure you that I didn't. It does have a mild salty taste, in fact it was very pleasant & refreshing. It is only a tiny plant but I believe it does get bigger & it self seeds. However I do want lots so I am going to invest in a packet of seeds.

On to the Sea Kale, well what can I say, anything you can steam & smother in hollandaise sauce is a winner in my book. Also I think it is quicker to crop than Asparagus, fingers crossed I will be eating both from my garden next year. It also means I need to buy a forcer or two, they have some nice reasonably priced terracotta ones at the local garden centre. No need to feel sorry for Mike, I don't need them yet, my birthday is in September I am more than happy to have them as an extra birthday present from him. I will have to net them though, they are from the brassicca family & as cabbage white butterfly's seem to use my garden as their main egg laying station they will be netted as soon as I plant them out.

Finally the Feverfew erm well basically it was free, but it is good for the wildlife & I can make things out of it & it was featured in the lovely The Cut Flower Patch book I bought last week. This book is as lovely as I thought it would be, I love it.

Well this post is a lot longer than I had planned, my apologies. I have to go supermarket shopping now & then I have to find some twine to tie in the sweet peas. As always enjoy your day xx

39 comments:

  1. Hope that you have a happy gardening, yarny, nice dinner and a glass of something kind of day! xx

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    1. Yes Amy I am having that sort of weekend. Mike is fishing today so it is just the boy & I. Harry will be on his xbox & I will be surrounded by yarn after I dig up some more bindweed. Have a fabulous day yourself.

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  2. Watch that feverfew as it self seeds like fury. I noticed samphire for sale in the local supermarket - I wonder if you could get cuttings to take from that?

    I like the EXTRA birthday present. My birthday is next weekend so I'll remember that!

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    1. So I believe, it is in a pot for now until Mike extends the other bed by the new path, I wont mind it spreading so much there. Although extras will be used to feed the compost bin. That's an interesting idea, I have seen it at the local farm shop, I might see if I can root some out of my pot to pot up elsewhere.

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  3. Mmm, samphire with fish is lovely. I've only ever seen it growing on the north Norfolk coast and have never thought of trying to grow it myself - I hope it's a success, will be watching with interest. I didn't know there was an edible version of sea kale - I've only ever seen the ornamental variety (Crambe cordifolia?), which grows to quite a size. Feverfew seeds itself all over our garden, but the pollinators like it so it stays; the leaves have an amazing scent and I can never decide whether I like it or not. Have a lovely weekend, whatever the weather! Jane x

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    1. Seakale for eating (best forced) is crambe maritima. It seems pretty happy here in wet Wales. You're not supposed to force the same plant every year so you need to plant a few and give them a rest in rotation. It's delicious forced - unforced it's a bit like chewing an old shoe!

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    2. Jane - It is easy to look after apparently, I will be making it a success though will be investing in more so Ii will be able to harvest quite a bit. Have you tried a Feverfew leaf, incredibly bitter at first but then I find it rather pleasant. I have been pondering over the Sea Kale for a while not quite sure how tall it will get but I have left enough space for it. Bernice, there were 5 plants in the tub, I'm going to force two one year & three the next but I'm not going to start that until next year.

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    3. Good idea - let them get established first. With the samphire do you have to be careful that the run off water doesn't go into the rest of your soil? Your other veggies won't be able to tolerate the salt.

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  4. I've never had samphire...never even seen it here. I'm intrigued.
    Jane x

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    1. I think it grows on the marshes around our coast line, I'm not sure if it is unique to the UK but it really is lovely, juicy & slightly salty.

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  5. I think I'm going to have to buy some samphire to try, even Mick's eager to have a taste after seeing it on Masterchef. Good luck with all your new purchases, I hope they grow well for you.

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    1. Oh yes you have to try it, it is every so slightly salty & juicy. I'm going to buy some seeds & sow them in a large trough.

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  6. I've never even thought about growing Samphire!!

    I too am a bad gardener and the only one in our Gardening Club that couldn't give a fig about the correct Latin names for all the plants in my garden, in fact I'm the only one that grows veggies and not flowers, flowers and more flowers.

    They think I'm an oddity but they need new members so they are very tolerant :-)

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    1. You have to try it Sue, it really is lovely. I wish there was a gardening club close to me, it sounds fun & you sound like a bit of a rebel now! :)

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    2. I always have been :-)

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  7. Lovely post Joanne and thank you for sharing I must admit I came back from the spring garden show held at Norfolk showground 7 plants and picked another two from a new garden centre on the way back home as one of my plants from the show needed special compost which I did not have at home

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    1. Linda I'm glad you had a lovely day, plant buying is so addictive isn't it. I'm looking forward to seeing what plants you bought.

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  8. I have collected samphire from the wild - it's delicious! Was wondering how you would recreate that intertidal salt marsh habitat then clicked on your link and read the bit about watering with a saline solution. Do let us know how you get on - sounds really interesting!

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    1. The little piece I tried was lovely, slightly salty & refreshing. I'm excited about it so am ordering some seeds so I can harvest plenty.

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  9. Wrt your faire isle, the phrase 'pull from the tangle' might be useful... Looking forward to seeing your progress with it! x

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    1. I'm looking forward to seeing the progress, you tube is being most helpful at the moment. It will be a long, drawn out process I fear, well a couple of months anyway.

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  10. Thanks for your inspiration. I have got some feverfewand sweet nicely seeds to plant. I am a novice gardener so it's all new and exciting! Susie Dixon in Cheshire.

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    1. Oh bless you thank you Susie. I have a Sweet Cicely plant in my garden & it really is a pretty thing. My best gardening year was the very first year I planted up my veg garden. It's such a fun thing to do, have you a blog?, it really is a helpful gardening community out there.

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  11. We've had a grotty day's weather too - especially a very strong wind, which is lashing my plants!
    Your new acquisitions sound interesting, but your garden must be getting nearly full by now! With Samphire and Seakale, you need to set up a beach...

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    1. I think the whole of the UK has by now. Not so windy here so my pants are safe. Yes they are very maritime like aren't they! They will fit nicely next to my shingle beach path.

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  12. I'll be interested to see how the samphire does. I've never tried it but it always looks intriguing and kind of fleshy. It's really windy here too. I been sand-blasted at the coast all afternoon and I'm feeling nicely exfoliated now. My tayberry is leaning at 45 degrees, but I'm not up to rescuing it tonight. Manana. Hope the rest of your weekend is good and that the knitting goes well. CJ xx

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    1. I'm going to buy more though probably seeds though this time. It really is nice & I can't wait until I have enough to make something with it. Well that is one way for smooth skin. Have fun with your tayberry, we are just having a few gusts, my plants are safe.

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  13. I've never thought about growing samphire or seakale but I'm intrigued now - thank you! I shall think about this more. Hope the knitting goes well.

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    1. That;s what happens when you trawl through gardening websites in work. Thank you, I will get there.

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  14. That all are new thing for me. Hope they all will grow so well, so I can learn about their growth through your posts forward. I can't wait to see the progress.

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    1. New for me too Endah, though I will have to buy more Samphire.

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  15. Ha! I like to be grown up too! And that is definitely the good thing about the rain....no watering!!! Good luck with the knitting...I was teaching myself through u tube as well. And wonderful new plants you got there!!! Have a wonderful weekend friend! Nicole xoxo

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    1. It has it's benefits doesn't it! Thank you, I don't know where I would be without it, sometimes you just need to see someone doing the task you want to accomplish. Have a lovely week.

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  16. It's been a grotty weekend here as well. Well done on trying new things, it'll be interesting to see how you do with these.
    I've always wondered why gardeners use proper Latin names for flowers but not for vegetables.
    Enjoy the rest of the weekend. Flighty xx

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    1. Still looking grotty out there today, no matter I have some weeding to do. An interesting thought, I'm wondering why now. Have a lovely Sunday.

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  17. Hello Joanne, I have just been reading back through some of your older posts, and your garden looks lovely. Looking forward to reading more.
    Thank you for following me.
    Tracey

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    1. Thank you, your very kind. My pleasure!

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  18. The samphire sounds intriuging, I ahve never tried it so I must look out for that, and as for the sea kale, I love curly kale and have had sea kale before so I shall also look for that too - thanks for sharing some fresh ideas. Its not always easy to find these slightly more unusual plants until they become a bit more fashionable.
    Good for you with the Fairisle - it always looks so beautiful and difficult, so well done for attempting it Jo! I look forward to seeing it.
    Gill xx

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    1. It has a slight salty taste to it, very fresh tasting too & juicy. I love curly kale to I have some seedlings for later on in the year. I particularly like going out to pick something fresh when I finish work so I try a couple of new things each year. It is going fairly well so far, I have a needle on order as I didn't have the circular needle size, so fingers crossed for next week.

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