Friday, 19 September 2014

Be careful what you wish for

Back when my vegetable garden was new I began trawling the internet for advice & tips. Along with gardening sites I became aware of blogs. Now it was a couple of years after I started my veg patch that I started my own little blog.

Back to the story there was one post & the blog name escapes me about raspberries. The post was mainly about how peeved the person was that their few canes of raspberries kept on throwing up runners far from the initial planting. Another peevement to these people was the amount of raspberries their plants produced were far too much!

What complete & utter tosh I though to myself, how on earth could you have too many raspberries!

Now while I may have a small garden I vowed to fill it full of wonderful things to feed me & raspberries were a definite. I had the ideal space in mind, there is a small path at the back of the veg bed which made the perfect spot.

I researched varieties carefully, autumn fruiting was the best for me being a lazy gardener. Short plants which could be cut down at the beginning of the year ready to sprout again, none of this tying in malarkey perfect!

Except nature rarely does what you want it to - roll on several years after my rose tinted specs moment!
I purchased approx 6 raspberry canes several years back, sufficient for what I wanted - a few punnet's of fruit & some for jam. Year on year these canes have multiplied despite careful culling, they send their vast runners through the veg patch. So much so I could pot them up & start my own little empire selling them. The canes have grown so large  & heavy with fruit they have broken the supports we had put up for them. There will be lots of culling next year!!

There is a thing of too many raspberries, even the birds are sick of them, so the moral of the story is be careful what you wish for.

Enjoy your day xx

43 comments:

  1. Raspberry looks like a nice plant. I have been looking for raspberry variety that adaptable on warm weather. I always dreaming pick my own raspberry from my homegarden.

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    1. Yes you might have some difficulty as I do believe they are a cool weather plant. Probably why they have done so well in my little plot.

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  2. I wished I lived next door to you.

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    1. Ha even the people I've been palming them off on are getting fed up now. You would have been very welcome to some.

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  3. Ha! They look fantastic!!!!! I love raspberries and am growing them in a pot this year.....I am tempting to put them in the ground as I think they would produce more fruit...though now I am rethinking it!! Happy gardening friend! Nicole xoxo

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    1. They will give you more fruit if you stick them in the ground, perhaps then you could do a similar post to mine in a couple of years.

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  4. Impressive, I love raspberries. I too am growing them in a pot but with little success this year.

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    1. I think they can struggle if in a pot, I believe they have rather a long root run but the roots are near the surface.

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  5. I have had the same problem this year - they are springing up everywhere - sometimes you just have to be brutal.

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    1. I'm glad I'm not the only one, I think! Yes some will definitely be dug up later on this year.

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  6. Freeze them and in February you will be glad you did! My raspberries are a.severely neglected and on the extremely long to do list.

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    1. The freezer is full of soft fruit including raspberries! & that's with two freezers. I'm planning to make some quick raspberry jam in the winter to have with scones & crumpets for Sunday tea.

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  7. I've inherited both summer and autumn fruiting rasberries and they've already got out of hand. I wouldn't mind so much but I don't even particularly like them.

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    1. I couldn't cope with the cutting down & tying in of the summer ones. They are one of my favourite fruits but there have been loads this year.

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  8. Mine are behind yours, but I love raspberries and grow autumn ones, grandsons love them and raid the plants each visit.

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    1. I love them too but have learnt that there are only so many you can eat. Luckily Mike & the kids like them too but they are fruiting very heavily this year!

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  9. My Raspberries are evidently not as prolific as yours, but that's probably due to where they are planted - despite being the best position in theory, the place where I put them has very poor (and dry) soil. Raspberries like moist soil... BTW, have you made your Raspberry jam yet?

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    1. There is an underground stream & & thick mulch of bark. They must be in their element! Yes I've made jam & cordial & froze lots, also given some away.

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  10. I wish our fruit bushes were so prolific!
    Jane x

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    1. These must be in the right spot, they have always done well.

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  11. I used to grow Autumn Bliss and the Yellow variety, in this garden I want to grow JoanJ. This is also an Autumn variety but with much bigger berries. The spot is earmarked for them and any runners will come up next door or in the lawn. Potential problem solved.

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    1. These are throwing runners up everywhere, there are now several canes in the field. I grow Autumn Bliss, Polka & all gold. They red ones are very prolific.

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  12. And they are so bloomin expensive in the shops too! Our cane died and our blueberry produces approx 4 berries a year, which I reckon I can just about cope with x

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    1. Shockingly so. Our blueberries have been a little thin on the ground this year, we still got far more than your 4 berries though.

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  13. Better too many than not enough. Flighty xx

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    1. They are dripping with fruit, truly the blackbirds waddle past the bush now, even they have had too many!

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  14. You could take cuttings and sell them on, or else swap them with neighbours for something you do want.

    They do look very prolific, they are obviously happy in their section of the garden and have decided on a takeover bid for the rest of it.

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    1. My sister was going to have some canes this year but they have re arranged their garden to give their chickens more space. I'm going to have cull a few when I cut them down later on in the year.

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  15. If even the blackbirds are sick of them it must be bad.. :)

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  16. I'll going to have to get tough with my raspberries.. I have summer and autumn, the canes have popped up all over so I feel drastic measures coming..lol

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  17. I am still loving the raspberries, we have had loads this year too. The poor garlic this year, and potatoes last have had to fight their way through the never ending runners! Wouldn't be without them though, eating a raspberry still warm from the sun is heavenly.

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  18. Eek. I have a bit of a raspberry problem at the allotment with canes popping up absolutely everywhere. And the main ones aren't producing any fruit. I'd like to dig them out, but it promises to be a mammoth job. I think I might put a couple of espaliered apple trees in their place. I suspect even if I could grow raspberries there the pigeons would have most of them. Enjoy your weekend. CJ xx

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  19. Hi there, just catching up now I am back, I have been reading, just not commenting. It is a funny thought that you could have too many of any homegrown fruit or veg, but it is possible, a bit like the mammoth harvests of courgettes that have turned into marrows, if you get too much of anything it just overwhelming isn't it. A nice problem to have, but a problem nonetheless. I hope that you work it out. The swap items - sent and received - from your last post are all lovely aren't they!! xx

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    1. For such a small plot I really didn't think I would get too much of anything, it has certainly been surprising.! Thanks Amy I enjoyed creating my parcel to send & was thrilled with the one I got back.

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  20. Joanne, what a hoot! I've long thought of planting a raspberry bush or two; now I'm almost glad I haven't gotten round to it!

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    1. Oh you will be fine with a couple, make sure you are strict with them each year. For all my complaining you cant beat a bowl of fresh raspberries from the garden.

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  21. Ours are surrounded by grass oaths so exploring shoots get the chop and I thin the canes of the autumn fruiters when they start to grow so everything is kept in check

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    1. I'm certainly going to thin them next year.

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  22. I'm looking forward to growing fruit, thanks for the tip, I will not plant too many :)

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    1. It took about 5 years for mine to turn into a thicket. I've learned my lesson now & will be more ruthless.

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  23. My childhood home included a rampant thicket of raspberries behind the garage that we inherited on moving in. My parents gave up attempting to tame it in the end. We would pick what we could reach and leave the rest for the mice and birds. I was always slightly frightened by it though, as on first surveying it Dad had declared (this was the 1970s) that it was so thick and impenetrable there could be 'a Jap still hiding out after the war in there and we wouldn't know.'

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    1. That's so funny, I'm convinced there is something hiding in mine, it is perfect cover for something!

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  24. I wish I had your problem, Joanne! I'm growing autumn bliss in a narrow stretch down one side of the veg patch. I've had a handful of raspberries a couple of times a week but not enough for jam. Mine have gone straight into the freezer to be gathered up for something special later in the year. I dug up all the runners in the first year and potted them up for friends. Now they get dug up and chucked away, can't have them taking over the raised beds!

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