Monday, 29 August 2016

A road long travelled

I'm back in work tomorrow - meh. Mike actually said I could leave if I liked but Harry is off to uni (hopefully) in four years and I like to save more towards that. 

Who knows though in seven years I could retire. Exciting possibilities ahead.









Apart from three years away I've always lived here. I bought a house just round the corner from my parents. Quite a few of my childhood friends did the same and now my youngest son is friends with their children. Some are also in the same year group at school which is nice.

I was very blessed last week as Mike did the majority of the dog walking. I only took Rocky out on Saturday as Mike was fishing. 

Rocky and I almost always take the route above, so close to my house I could almost touch it. The cut off for the primary school is just by the bend in the top photo. The school which my siblings and I attended and our children too. 

This road is still much travelled by us all. My sister lives at the very top out of sight just round the corner.  Harry wanders up and down it each day to meet his friends in the village. They've had a wonderfully idyllic school summer holiday. The group of them tramping up and down the lane and through the fields. It's also the route to and from secondary school if walking.  Similar to me at that age.

They are too old now to find old dens made in the hedgerows, explore the ditches looking for creatures or paddle in the shallow stream. I think they still visit the small wood of which there are two.

Times change of course. The farm is now a farm park, the small field where the best hedges for making dens was sold  and a few houses were built there about 20 years ago. 

Times might change but thoughts seldom do.

"Joanne, where do those little girls I see visiting next door live"?
"In those new houses at the bottom mum"

My thoughts were interrupted as Rocky and I returned from our Saturday morning walk. I spotted three young boys in the middle of the road by the houses. Naturally I knew the boys and how long their families had been living there. Bikes akimbo on the road as is the traditional position here often as goal posts. Never on the pavement and there is always a mad scramble when a car approaches. 

They were looking at something in the middle of the road and as I came into view they looked up at me.
One of the boys I know very well as he is the youngest brother of one of Harry's closest school friends. His father was a childhood friend of mine. This boy has chosen to call me 'Harry's mum'

'Harry's mum Harry's mum there's a frog in the middle of the road'

'Pick him up and put him in the hedge then'

'Ew' said three seven year old boys together then 'Oh no a car is coming, it's going to get squished' - mad scramble to remove bikes.

The frog wasnt squished and after the close escape one of the boys decided he would be brave and pick it up. Except the frog had enough by this time and was unnervingly to the boys hopping off. 
Now they were worried for their new friend so one made a grab for it but really did not like the feeling of the frog and started grimacing. 

I handed Rocky over and the took the frog to put in a place of safety. Rocky was rather exhausted by all this palaver so a short talk on frogs was given and the hound and I returned home for a much deserved rest and treat!  


This is my greenhouse frog - Francis x 






26 comments:

  1. A great froggy tale, it conjures up a lovely country image of days gone by. People move around so much these days, it's nice to hear you enjoy your familiar surroundings. x

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  2. My goodness, how I loved village life when I was growing up, it's great when you know everyone and they know you.

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  3. It must be wonderful to feel so rooted in one place, and such a beautiful, country place. When I go back to my childhood area it feels so alien, everything and everyone has moved on. Have a good week back at work, seven years will fly by!

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  4. A nice, rather reflective post. Flighty xx

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  5. Oh wow ! I enjoyed reading this post so much.

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  6. We have never regretted retiring early. I'm guessing there is less anti-social behaviour in communities where everyone knows one another.

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  7. My family (small as it is) is flung far and wide. None of us live in the same town. I am always envious of people who say they can just quickly pop over to their parents' place for a coffee or something. How wonderful to live in a village close to family and friends from your entire life! My kids barely know my few childhood friends, but not any of their kids.
    Retirement is looming close for us too (well, ten years or so). Love the shots of "your road".
    Wendy

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  8. I had to scroll back to look for your sister's place at the top of the hill. :) I did retire a little early, not that we could afford to lose my paycheck, but the company I worked for was moving to Research Triangle Park adding another thirty minutes or more to my already hour drive to work. It was a dream come true. Love the story about the frog. So much like when my girls were young.

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  9. I love the history you have in the place you live. I think it is wonderful to be in a close knit community, we do not have that here where I live and I miss it.
    Hugs,
    Meredith

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  10. Sounds just like my childhood, sadly the village grew and grew and is now mostly a dormitory town.

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  11. I don't live where I grew up but I'm only a couple of miles away. I stopped working six years ago but I don't say I'm retired, I feel too young at 47, and there's always a chance that I might end up getting another job at some point yet.

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  12. I love to see the lots of fruit there.

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  13. Hope the return to work has gone well. It's always hard after a lovely break. Like you, I've always lived in the same town (apart from the years at uni). Occasionally, I dream about moving but deep down I know we're staying put. Well, for one thing, the neighbours are trouble-free here!

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  14. I moved often as a child, my dad's job meant that every 2 - 3 years he was promoted or sent to another location. I have no familiar childhood base where as my husband does and we often compare which is better/worse/different/more interesting. Hopefully my boys will feel more settled and stable that I do having lived where we are now for most of their lives.

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  15. Frogs are my favourite animal.

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  16. What a lovely cosy picture of generations of countryside life, Jo. Completely different from my growing up years as my dad's job in the Royal Navy had us moving every couple of years. It's different for my son who was born a mile down the road (we've had 3 homes in this area but never moved far). He and his mates have strong friendships over many years, very reassuring for me as a mum! I smiled at you being called Harry's Mum - I was known as Charlie's Mum for many years but now they call me by my proper name!

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  17. Lovely! We love not far from where M was born and grew up. Xx

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  18. Must be lovely to have roots like yours. I've lived all over the place, both in child/adulthood. I've not worked for a loooong time, although I am retired now. Being made redundant at 50 was for me, terrible & I couldn't get another job as I was considered "old". Well maybe I'm old now, but I wasn't back then. Thanks for the a lovely post and take care.

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  19. I love frogs. Thanks for sharing it.

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  20. Such a lovely feeling of belonging when you bring up your family where you grew up. It sounds very unspoilt still where you live too. Loved reading about the frog! And wow...you have a frog in your greenhouse, how lucky!
    Helen xox

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  21. Lovely storey of the greenhouse frog, glad you could rescue him x

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  22. I'm desperately trying to catch up after a long silence. I like you bought a house round the corner from my parents and have lived in my village all my life. It's weird seeing children that were much younger than me now grown up with their own families. I like the continuity and the roots though!! I was always a bit of a 'tom boy' as a child and neither then nor now would I have had an issue picking up the frog..lol

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  23. What a lovely post, so gentle and full of nostalgia. I grew up in a town, but in our little part of town it would be reported to my mum that I had cycled the wrong way up the one way street again even before I got home. Everyone knew each other and you couldn't get away with anything! I would retire tomorrow if I could!!

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  24. Where you live sounds idyllic - and a walk to secondary school which goes across fields?! I don't think there are many places where that happens now. What a lovely place to grow up, and to raise your own children.

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  25. What a wonderful picture you paint of a lovely place to live. I love that you have such deep roots there, your community must be wonderful and safe. A lovely post, thank you for sharing!

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